Monday, March 31, 2014

Write an Argument Essay: The Introduction Paragraph


Warm Up  Happy Monday!  I hope you each had a beautiful weekend.  Now it's time to get to work!  Let's begin today by heading over to School Loop and checking your updated Language Arts and Social Studies grades.  Your grades reflect your work on last week's reading log, your week of Language Arts assignments, the Shang Dynasty Quiz, and your digital Ancient China assignments.  Are your grades where you want them to be?  If not, what's going on?  What's up with the Digital Reading Log?  Why is this posing such a challenge to so many of you?  Let's have a class conversation.  By the way, if you have any personal concerns about your grades, do not hesitate to message me privately using Loop Mail.  I'd also like to introduce you to a new method for turning in late assignments (which you may have noticed a link to on the right side of the blog).   

Grammar Practice: Apostrophes  Head on over to NoRedInk for some 'Apostrophe' practice.  If you need a refresher on how to use apostrophes before you begin your assignment, visit here.  

Argument Essay Resources:  Outline, Checklist, and Transition Word List  To support you in the writing of your Argument Essay you have several resources available to you.  You can find an Argument Essay Outline here, an Argument Essay Checklist here, and a handy Transition Word List here.  

Write an Argument Essay: The Introduction Paragraph  Your introduction paragraph should include your "hook," your summary of the issue, and, most importantly, your thesis statement.  You should have written each of these last week, so now it's just time to put them together and begin your essay.  Write your essay using the document here.  It includes an outline and reminders on how to strengthen each section of your essay.  As soon as you don't need one of the added supports any longer, just delete it from your doc.  Good luck on your essay!  

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  (2.)  Complete the NoRedInk Apostrophe assignment.  (3.) Complete the introduction paragraph of your Argument Essay.  

Bonus Video of the Day  Have you seen the new movie that was just released about Cesar Chavez?  If you haven't, consider checking it out.  Cesar Chavez was such an important American Civil Right hero and meant so much to so many families and workers right here in our own community.  You can watch a preview below.   






Friday, March 28, 2014

Write an Argument Essay: Summarizing the Issue


Warm Up  Aloha Friday!  Let's begin today reading and analyzing some nonfiction at Newsela.  Log in, check your "Binder," and locate the article entitled "Complaints about homework go from too little to too much."  Make sure the reading level is set to 790L (Grade Level: 5).  Read the article carefully and then take the quiz.  Good luck!

Core Skill Activity: Summarizing  An objective summary is a short statement or paragraph that tells what an article is about. An objective summary does not include irrelevant details or the opinions of the person writing it.  A sample of an objective summary of the article “Should School Start Later?” can be found here.  It contains some information that it shouldn’t.  Let's edit the document and remove unnecessary sentences and phrases.

Write an Argument Essay: Summarizing the Issue  After writing the hook, you need to let readers know a little about the issue you will be writing about.  This is not your point of view; it's a very brief summary of the issue-in this case, the debate over whether school should begin later in the day.  Practice summarizing the issue using the same document you used yesterday.  If you still need a copy, you can find it here.  

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  Deadline:  I will be checking this week's reading log on Monday, March 31.  (2.) Complete your 'Summary of the Issue' (Argument Essay: Step 6).     



Thursday, March 27, 2014

Write an Argument Essay: The Hook


Warm Up  Let's get serious about reading this quarter!  Use this time to either silent read, take an Accelerated Reader test, or complete an online reading log entry.  

Write an Argument Essay: The Hook  The very beginning of your essay is called the hook because it "hooks" your readers' attention.  The hook should relate to the topic of your essay, but it can take many forms.  It can be an anecdote (a very short story), a fact, a quote, or a question.  Practice writing your 'hook' using the assignment here.  

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  (2.)  'Write an Argument Essay' Assignment (Steps 5).       

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Write an Argument Essay: Reviewing the First Steps

Warm Up  Still trying to wrap your head around what an argument essay is and how to write one?  Watch the video below.


Write an Argument Essay: Reviewing the First Steps  Due to network issues yesterday, may of us did not have quality time to start fully developing our point of view for our argument essay.  If you haven't yet made a copy of the assignment,  you can find it here.  Today make sure you follow the steps, which we will review in class.  Step 1: Decide what you think.  Step 2: Find your support.  Step 3: Acknowledge the other side.  Step 4: Craft your thesis.  Make sure you have steps 1-4 completed before the start of class on Thursday.  

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  (2.)  'Write an Argument Essay' Assignment (Steps 1-4).       


    

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Write an Argument Essay: Getting Started



Warm Up  As we begin to think about how to make a convincing argument about an issue supported by evidence, let's check out a real-life debate that some in the country are having: whether or not we should pay low-income employees, such as fast-food workers, more money.  Learn more about the debate by reading an article featuring the pros and cons at Newsela.  Log in, click "Binder," and locate the article entitled "PRO/CON: Should workers in fast-food restaurants make more money?"  Make sure you set the reading level to 840L (Grade Level: 5) and after you finish reading, if you have time, please take the quiz.  

Write an Argument Essay: Getting Started  Yesterday you read about the issues involved regarding whether or not school should start later.  You also began to research evidence supporting each side of the debate.  Today you will decide what your think and begin to develop your argument.  Additional information/opinions related to school start times and sleep can be found here and here. You can also find a current debate about the issue on debate.org, an online community where people around the world come to debate and read the opinions of others.  Once you've decided on your point of view, you can begin your assignment here.  Follow steps 1-4.   

Homework  30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  






Monday, March 24, 2014

Debate: Should School Start Later?


Warm Up  Should school start later?  Yes or no?  State your opinion and explain your reasoning on our classroom wall on Padlet.  

Scope Article:  "Should School Start Later?"  Let's explore the issues involved in the debate and read the article here.  

Examining Both Sides of the Debate  Use evidence from the article to support each side of this debate.  Write your evidence on the document here.  After examining points on both side of the debate, as well as your own beliefs, use the same document and state your opinion on whether school should start later or not.  This may become the eventual thesis statement for your argument essay.  

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  (2.) Complete your "What Do You Think?"  Notetaking Guide.  

Monday Blues Video Special  For those of you suffering from the Monday Blues, enjoy this amazing rendition of the Lorde song "Team" by a rather sad clown.   



Friday, March 21, 2014

Test Day


Warm Up  Good morning!  It's time to demonstrate what you have learned about "Commas, Fragments, and Run-ons."  Go to No Red Ink and start the quiz of the same name. You will receive extra points if you fix your errors after completion.  

'Nadia the Willful' Test  Now demonstrate your understanding of the short story "Nadia the Willful" here.  

Career Zone California - Interest Profiler  If you finish your assessments early, explore possible future careers by taking the Interest Profiler here.  Make sure you "create an account" at the site before you leave so you can save your results.  

Homework  30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  Deadline:  I will be checking this week's reading log on Monday. 

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Understanding Theme in 'Nadia the Willful'


Warm Up  Good morning!  Please visit No Red Ink and continue to practice how avoid fragments and run-ons by working on the assignment "Run-ons, Fragments, and Subordinating Conjunctions."  For a refresher on what fragments and run-ons are and how to fix them go here.  If you don't finish your 15 questions on No Red Ink in class, please complete for homework.  We will have a quiz on "Commas, Fragments, & Run-ons" tomorrow, Friday, March 21.  


Understanding Theme in 'Nadia the Willful'  Yesterday we read the very powerful short story "Nadia the Willful" about a family coping with the loss of a loved one.  Today we are going to explore the theme of the story in small groups.  Remember that the the theme is the meaning or a moral of a story and can be identified by examining elements of the story, including:  the conflicts in the story, the thoughts and feelings of the characters, the important things the characters say, events and character actions, how characters change, and the lessons characters learn.  In your small groups you will be tasked with choosing between two suggested themes of the story, writing a paragraph explaining your choice, and using evidence from the story to support your ideas.  You can find the assignment here.  What is not finished in class becomes homework.

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  (2.) Complete your No Red Ink grammar assignment and study for your "Commas, Fragments, and Run-ons" quiz. (3.) Complete the "Nadia the Willful - Characters and Theme" assignment.  Deadline:  All work related to "Nadia the Willful" must be turned into your name folder within your Language Arts folder before the start of class tomorrow, Friday, March 21, if you want to receive full credit.     

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Bus Evacuation Drill


Bus Evacuation Drill  Surprise!  It's time for the annual 'Bus Evacuation Drill.'  We will be heading over to the bus circle to practice.  I expect each of you to be on your very best behavior and take this drill seriously.  

No Red Ink - Grammar Practice  Please visit No Red Ink and continue to practice how to properly use commas by working on the assignment "Commas, Fragments, & Run-ons."  For another reminder about comma use check here.  For a refresher on what fragments and run-ons are and how to fix them go here.  If you don't finish your 15 questions on No Red Ink in class, please complete for homework.  

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  (2.) Complete your grammar lesson on No Red Ink.

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

'Nadia the Willful' and Identifying Theme


Warm Up  Good morning!  Yesterday you were asked to analyze a favorite movie or book and try to identify its theme.  Go to Padlet and share the title and theme of your book or movie on our digital classroom wall.  

"Nadia the Willful" Open your Language of Literature textbooks to page 67. Examine the "Build Background" section and the images.  Take note of the setting of this story.  Read the "Focus Your Reading" section about what theme is in a story and how to determine it.  Today will be reading the short story "Nadia the Willful" and try to identify its theme.  We will pay special attention to the characters and their actions, speech, thoughts, and how they change, as clues to determining the story's theme.  You can find the assignment "Nadia the Willful - Characters and Theme" here.  Make a copy so we can fill it out together as we read.   

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  (2.) Complete the "Nadia the Willful - Characters and Theme" assignment.  (Make sure it is turned in to your name folder with your Language Arts folder.) 

Monday, March 17, 2014

Introduction to Theme


Warm Up  Today will be begin learning about how to avoid run-on sentences and practicing how to use commas with a group of conjunctions known affectionately as "FANBOYS."  If you need a refresher on proper comma use, you can go here.  When you are ready, head on over to No Red Ink, log in, and begin the assignment entitled "Commas with FANBOYS." There are only 10 questions.  If you get a question wrong, please fix your mistakes in order to receive full credit.  What is not finished in class becomes homework.  Note that we will be having an exam on this content later in the week.  

Introduction to Theme  Get familiar with what the "theme of a story" is and how to identify it by watching the short video below.  Next, for practice analyze a favorite movie or novel and then try to determine its theme.  You can find the assignment "Identifying Theme" here. Make a copy and then get to work.  


Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  (2.) Complete your No Red Ink "Commas with FANBOYS" assignment.  (3.) Complete your "Identifying Theme" assignment.  (Make sure it is turned in to your name folder with your Language Arts folder.)  

Friday, March 14, 2014

Building Background: Who are the Bedouins?


Warm Up  Next week we will read the short story "Nadia the Willful," which features a group of people known as the Bedouins.  Read some background information about these people here and here.  Be prepared to discuss and share what you learn.   

Video: Life as a Bedouin  Watch an excerpt of the video Latcho Drom below and learn more about what life as part of a Bedouin tribe is like.  Share what you've learned and the observations you've made about the Bedouin from the text above and the video below here.  



Library Visit  Are you on pace to reach your A.R. goal?  Do you need a good book to read? Let's head over to the library and pick up new A.R. books!  

Homework  30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Grammar and Reading Practice


Warm Up  Good morning!  Visit the news and reading website Newsela. Log in and click the "Binder" link at the top of the screen.  Next, locate and select the article entitled "Georgia to help its homeless college students." Today, make sure the reading level of the text is set to 800L (Grade Level: 5).  Read the article carefully and then take the quiz.  Good luck!  

Commas, Fragments, and Run-ons (No Red Ink)  Head on over to noredink and log in. Locate the assignment "Commas, Fragments, and Run-on" and begin.  This is practice, so take the opportunity to understand and fix your mistakes.  If you finish early, you may explore other parts of the website.  (Update:  This assignment is no longer available online.)  

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  (2.) Finish your "Commas, Fragments, and Run-on" assignment on  noredink.  (3.) We are going to the library tomorrow (Friday).  Bring your old books if you would like to check out new ones.     
    





Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Capitalization Assessment



Capitalization Assessment (No Red Ink)  Due to it being a restructured day, let's skip the 'Warm Up' and begin our Capitalization Quiz right away.  Head on over to noredink, log in, and find the assigned quiz and begin.  If you finish early, you may fix your mistakes or explore other parts of the website.  Good luck!  

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on one of the digital reading logs available.  Our weekly Google Form reading log is here and the Google Spreadsheet reading log can be found here.  (2.) If you haven't already, please complete all work related to capitalization on noredink, including your Capitalization Practice and fixing the mistakes from your Capitalization Quiz.  


Tuesday, March 11, 2014

It's Grammar Time!

Warm Up  Please go to Google Drive, open your name folder within your Language Arts folder, open up each of your 'All Summer in a Day' assignments and check your grade (on a 5 point scale) for each.  Next, head on over to School Loop and see how these assignments, as well as your 'All Summer in a Day' test, impacted your overall grade. If you received a zero or didn't receive full credit, your assignments were either missing or incomplete. While in School Loop, please take note of the Loop Mail feature at the top of the screen.  Loop Mail allows you to send messages to people within the school community, including me.  If for example, you later locate your assignments and move them to your name folder or finish work that was incomplete, you can use Loop Mail to notify me of the changes you made and to let me know that you would like me to regrade your work.  You can also use Loop Mail to ask any questions or share any concerns you may have.  Loop Mail is a powerful tool that allows you to advocate for yourself.  Use it!  

'No Red Ink' Grammar Practice  Let's practice capitalization today!  Head on over to to the website noredink and select 'Student.'  Input the following class code: kfeawkw3.  Next, fill out the rest of the information in the box and click 'Sign Up.'  You will be then asked a series of questions and asked about your likes and interests, which will allow your account to be personalized just for you.  Once you've personalized your account, find the assignment "Capitalization Practice," and click 'Begin Assignment.'  You will answer a series of 20 questions and have the opportunity to correct mistakes along the way.  The assignment is worth 10 points towards your School Loop assignment grade. Make sure you complete it so you are prepared for tomorrow's capitalization assessment.  

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on this week's online reading and reflection log (using Google Forms) here.  If you are having issues with the Google Form reading log and/or having problems connecting from home, try the new alternative reading log using Google Spreadsheet here.  It's very similar to a traditional paper-based reading log.  Make a copy, put it in your name folder within you Language Arts folder, and make at least five complete entires on it throughout the week.  (2.) If you still need to submit your 'All Summer in a Day' assignments for late credit, please do so.  (3.) Finish your capitalization practice on noredink.    

Monday, March 10, 2014

Introducing Newsela and Assessing 'All Summer in a Day'


Warm Up  Good morning!  Visit the news and reading website Newsela. Click Register at the top of the screen. Enter this class code: XHNCE.  Then fill in the rest of the blanks and click Register.  Once you are registered click the "Binder" link at the top of the screen.  Next, locate and select the article entitled "Think about college, university tells grade school kids." Today, make sure the reading level of the text is set to 690L.  Read the article carefully and then take the quiz.  Good luck!  

All Summer in a Day - Test  Show me what you've learned!  Take the "All Summer in a Day" test here.  

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on this week's online reading and reflection log (using Google Forms) here.  If you are having issues with the Google Form reading log and/or having problems connecting from home, try the new alternative reading log using Google Spreadsheet here.  It's very similar to a traditional paper-based reading log.  Make a copy, put it in your name folder within you Language Arts folder, and make at least five complete entires on it throughout the week.   (2.) If for some reason you haven't submitted your completed work related to "All Summer in a Day" to your name folder within your Language Arts folder, please do so now in order to receive full credit.  Partial credit will still be available for work submitted late.   (3.) Optional: If you're interested you can watch the full video of "All Summer in a Day" video and reflect on it here.  


  


Friday, March 7, 2014

All Summer in a Day - Evaluating and Understanding Theme


Warm Up  Let's practice capitalization and punctuation.  Visit Grammar Blast and see how many points you can earn.  If you would rather take an AR test, you may do so here.  

All Summer in a Day - Evaluating  Get into small groups today and discuss how you evaluated some of the elements of "All Summer in a Day."  Remember that when you evaluate a story you make a judgment (form an opinion) about it and you support your evaluations with facts, examples, and details from the story.  Make sure each person in the group gets to share their evaluations and that you use academic language in your interactions with each other.  You can find the assignment here.  

All Summer in a Day - Theme  A theme is the meaning or moral of a story. Themes are usually unstated. To discover a theme you must make inferences based on the characters and the plot. Begin to learn about theme by examining some of the clues to the theme of "All Summer in a Day." With the members of your group, discuss and fill out the Google Doc here.

Homework (1.) If you haven't already, try to get all of your work related to "All Summer in a Day" completed and turned into your name folder within Language Arts folder on your Google Drive ASAP. Deadline: Before the start of class on Tuesday. (2.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on the online reading and reflection log (using Google Forms) here.  Deadline: Make sure all entries for the week have beens submitted before the start of class on Monday.    

Thursday, March 6, 2014

All Summer in a Day - Science Fiction


Warm Up  Being a regular computer user is going to require you to become a proficient typer.  Visit the App section of your Chromebook and click on Typing Club and get some practice.  If you would rather take an AR test, you may do so here.  

All Sumer in a Day - Science Fiction  Let's read "All Summer in a Day," an example of the science fiction genre, written by the terrific author Ray Bradbury.  Remember some of the key elements of science fiction:  the action usually takes place in the future or in outer space, and includes details about futuristic technology and real or possible science.  Think about these elements as you read today.  The story can be found beginning on page 67 in your Interactive Reader (as well as page 209 of your Language of Literature textbook.)  As you read, make note of both the story's fantastic, imaginary details, as well as its realistic, concrete details using the Google Doc here.  Remember to make a copy of the assignment so you can add text to it.  When it is ready to be turned it, make sure you put in the folder with your name on it inside of your Language Arts folder.  

Homework  (1.) If you didn't finish your "All Summer in a Day" Science Fiction assignment, please do so for homework.  Additionally, continue your examination of "All Summer in a Day" by evaluating the elements of the story.  When you evaluate a story you make a judgment about it. Support your evaluations with facts, examples, and details from the story. You can find the assignment here.  You do not have to finish the assignment tonight, but at least get started on it.  Remember to make a copy of the assignment so you can add text to it. When it is ready to be turned it, make sure you put in the folder with your name on it inside of your Language Arts folder.  (2.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on the new online reading and reflection log (using Google Forms) here



Wednesday, March 5, 2014

What is Science Fiction?


Warm Up  Log on to School Loop and check your current grades and missing assignments. Next, log on to Accelerated Reader and check your reading progress.  Finally, ask yourself: Am I doing everything I can to be a successful student?   

What is Science Fiction?  Find out about this genre of literature by watching the video below and then reading your textbook's explanation here.  


Preview: All Summer in a Day  Watch the opening sequence of the video below of Ray Bradburry's classic science fiction story All Summer in a Day, which we will begin reading in class tomorrow.  Write about the elements of science fiction you noticed here.  


Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on the new online reading and reflection log (using Google Forms) here.  (2.) If you didn't in class, finish the All Summer in a Day analysis using Google Forms here

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

The Future of Education is Here


Warm-Up  How are you feeling about finally having your new Chromebook in your hands? How do you think this educational tool might change the way your learn and feel about school?  Write your response here.

Explore Google Drive  It's time to visit your Google Drive, where you will be doing most of your schoolwork using your Chromebook.  While you're here, let's make sure you have properly built your class folders, shared them with your teachers, and let Mr. McGinty introduce you to some of the Google software you will be using in the classroom.  Go to Google Drive here.

Grammar Practice  It's time to practice your punctuation skills.  Try your hand out at the online punctuation game Comma Chameleon.  Feel free to practice from home as well.    

Homework  (1.) 30 minutes of silent reading at home.  Make sure to record your reading on the new online reading and reflection log (using Google Forms) here.  (2.) Show off your Chromebook to your family and share some of the amazing things it can do.  Discuss ways you envision it's going to improve the quality of your education.