Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Identifying Nonfiction Elements in "Call of Duty" (Day 2)

Guided Reading and Identifying Nonfiction Elements: "Call of Duty"  Today we will continue reading "Call of Duty" and identifying and analyzing the nonfiction elements present in the article. A copy of the "Call of Duty" reading selection can still be found in your Language Arts folders, and you still can find a link to it here as well. The assignment Identifying Nonfiction Elements - "Call of Duty" can also still be found n your folders. 

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) Complete the Identifying Nonfiction Elements - "Call of Duty" assignment. DueFriday, October 3.    

Monday, September 29, 2014

Identifying Nonfiction Elements in "Call of Duty"


 Essential Questions  Is it fair to ask animals to perform dangerous jobs? What does it mean to be loyal? How can animals help us heal?

 

Build Background: Video  Today we will continue working with narrative nonfiction as we read "Call of Duty," the inspiring true story of Marine Corporal Jose Armenta, which explores the powerful bond between military working dogs and their handlers. Before we read, we will watch the short video "Beyond the Story: Into the World of Military Working Dogs,” in order to build some background on the relationship between soldiers and military dogs.  

Vocabulary Preview  "Call of Duty," the narrative nonfiction piece we will be reading together today, is heavy on terminology that we may be unfamiliar with. It's important for us to preview these words before we read so that we can better understand the selection. Each group will be assigned one word to learn and master and then will present it's meaning and additional information to the class.  















Guided Reading and Identifying Nonfiction Elements: "Call of Duty"  A copy of the "Call of Duty" reading selection has been placed in your Language Arts folders, and you can find a link to it here as well. The assignment we will be working on as we read, Identifying Nonfiction Elements - "Call of Duty", has also been placed in your folders. 

Homework  Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry.   

Friday, September 26, 2014

Central Ideas and Details in "Unbroken"


Silent Reading and AR Test Taking  Aloha Friday! Please ease into your Friday with a little silent reading. Make sure you are reading a book that you are passionate about. If not, during your free time head on over to the school library or visit my class library and find a book just right for you. 

There are a just a few short weeks left in the quarter. How are you progressing towards your AR goal? If you need to check your progress or take a test today, please do so.  

 Today's Guiding Question  What are central ideas and details and how do we find them in text? 


Central Ideas and Details in "Unbroken"  A central idea of a story or article is one of the main points the author is making. Sometimes "central idea" is called "main idea." A central idea can always be supported with details from the text. 

Today we are going to practice identifying central ideas and their supporting details from "Unbroken: A Year in the Life of a Girl with Caner." You can find a link to the reading selection here. The assignment Central Ideas and Details - "Unbroken" can be found in your Language Arts folders. This assignment will be due next Friday, October 3.    

Homework  Make sure you read for 30 minutes at least once over the weekend and make an entry on your Digital Reading Log(Remember that your reading log has been placed in your Language Arts folders. If for some reason you need to make a copy of the reading log, you can find a link to it here.) I will be grading this week's Reading Log on Monday, September 29.

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Identifying Nonfiction Elements in "Unbroken"


Grammar Practice: Sentences and Fragments (No Red Ink)  Today we will continue practicing identifying complete sentences and avoiding fragments using an on online
program called No Red Ink. Once you get to the site, click on STUDENT in the center of the screen. Next, click sign up with Google+ and the click your account and your in. You will then be asked for your class code, which are as follows: Period 2 - h7f97aa8, Period 3 - 3xeawa4c, and Period 5 - xh8vcm3x. After you are linked to your class, you will be given the option of personalizing your No Red Ink experience by asking a series of questions about your likes and interests. Finally, you're ready to start today's assignment. Locate "Sentences and Fragments" and click begin assignment. You have until Friday, October 3, to finish this assignment.   

Identifying Nonfiction Elements in "Unbroken" Today we are going to continue discussing and analyzing our narrative nonfiction story "Unbroken." We are going to specifically focus on some of the elements of nonfiction present in the selection, including author's word choice, cause and effect, central idea and evidence, and objective summary. You can still find the document 'Identifying Nonfiction Elements - Unbroken' in your Language Arts folders, as well as a link here. You can also find a link to the reading selection itself here.  

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) Tomorrow is Friday! We have a couple assignments from the week that need to be completed and "turned in" tomorrow Friday, September 26, including: Close Reading  Questions - "Unbroken" and Identifying Nonfiction Elements - "Unbroken".    

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

A Close Reading of "Unbroken"


Guided Reading: "Unbroken: A Year in the Life of a Girl With Cancer"  Today we will continue reading the narrative nonfiction selection "Unbroken: A Year in the Life of a Girl with Cancer" from Scope Magazine. You can still find a copy of the story in your Language Arts folders, as well as a link here 

As we read, we will continue to do a '"Close Reading" of the text. You can find the assignment 'Close Reading Questions - Unbroken' in your Language Arts folders, as well as a link here 

Video of the Day  Watch the inspiring video from the Children's Hospital at Dartmouth, featuring kids, many like Lauren who are battling cancer, who refuse to give up and instead choose to fight and "Roar!"   


Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) Complete the 'Close Reading Questions' assignment. Due: Friday, September 26.    

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

What Is Narrative Nonfiction?



What is Narrative Nonfiction?  We all know that nonfiction is text made up of information that is true. But what happens when the nonfiction text reads like a story? What's that called? It's called Narrative Nonfiction and we're going to read an example of it today.  But before we do, study the images below and learn more about Narrative Nonfiction.   



Previewing Vocabulary  "Unbroken: A Year in the Life of a Girl With Cancer," the narrative nonfiction piece we will be reading together today, is heavy on medical terminology, or medical words. It's important for us to preview these words before we read so that we can better understand the selection. Each group will be assigned one word to learn and master and then will present it's meaning and additional information to the class. Feel free to Google your word for more information and/or to find an accompanying image.   


















Guided Reading: "Unbroken: A Year in the Life of a Girl With Cancer"  Today, both before we read and as we read, we will be tasked with identifying and analyzing some of the various elements of nonfiction present in the selection. You can find the assignment 'Identifying Nonfiction Elements - Unbroken' in your Language Arts folders, as well as a link here

We will also be tasked with doing a "Close Reading" of the text. When we read closely, we are reading deeply and sometimes even going beyond the literal words on the page. As "close readers," we are "reading between the lines," making inferences, and considering the meaning and purpose of words, phrases, and ideas. Prepare to avoid the surface today as you read and dig deep! You can find the assignment 'Close Reading Questions - Unbroken' in your Language Arts folders, as well as a link here

We will be reading and analyzing "Unbroken: A Year in the Life of a Girl With Cancer" over the course of the next several days. You can find a copy of the story in your Language Arts folders, as well as a link here

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) Make some progress on your 'Unbroken' assignments.  

Monday, September 22, 2014

Mr. McGinty is Missing!

Substitute Teacher Extraordinaire - Ms. Eddy
Announcement  Happy Monday! I'm sorry I couldn't be with you today; I had a teaching conference to attend. But I'm leaving you in the very capable hands of Ms. Eddy, one of the finest substitute teachers around. Please follow Ms. Eddy's directions and treat her with the respect she deserves. I will see you all tomorrow!  

Grammar Practice: Coordinating Conjunctions  Let's continue to learn about how to bring parts of sentences together. Conjunctions are types of words that serve as connectors between words, phrases, and sentences. Read the graphic below to learn how conjunctions can specifically bring two separate sentences (or independent clauses together).  



The special type of conjunctions that work to combine two separate sentences into one are called coordinating conjunctions; they're also affectionately know as FANBOYS. Study the FANBOYS conjunctions below.     

Now let's practice working with conjunctions by exploring the lesson here. First, click on "Lesson 1: Coordinating Conjunctions." Listen to the instruction (If you have headphones, please use them). Next, complete the activity that follows. If you have time, you may continue your conjunction practice by playing the game here

Summary Paragraph: "Tuesday of the Other June"  Today is your last day to work on your summary paragraph in class. Just a reminder: Your paragraph must include a topic sentence that identifies the title, author and the topic of the story. The content of the paragraph must incorporate the main events from the beginning, middle and end of the story. Your paragraph should be written in your own words and not include personal opinions. Finally, your paragraph should be well-organized and include appropriate transitions. The summary paragraph assignment is due tomorrow, Tuesday, September 23. If you finish early, you may read and/or take A.R. quizzes.  

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) Complete your "Tuesday of the Other June" Summary Paragraph, which is due tomorrow, Tuesday, September 23 

Friday, September 19, 2014

Quizzing and Summarizing


Run-on Sentence Quiz  Happy Friday! Let's start the day by demonstrating what we've learned about run-on sentences and how to repair them. You may find your quiz here. If you finish early, you may read and/or take A.R. quizzes.  

Summary Paragraph: "Tuesday of the Other June"  Today is your last day to get help from me on your summary paragraph. Just a reminder: Your paragraph must include a topic sentence that identifies the title, author and the topic of the story. The content of the paragraph must incorporate the main events from the beginning, middle and end of the story. Your paragraph should be written in your own words and not include personal opinions. Finally, your paragraph should be well-organized and include appropriate transitions. The summary paragraph assignment is due Tuesday, September 23. If you finish early, you may read and/or take A.R. quizzes.  

Video of the Day  Bruno Mars says, "Don't give up!"  


Homework  Make sure you read for 30 minutes at least once over the weekend and make an entry on your Digital Reading Log(Remember that your reading log has been placed in your Language Arts folders. If for some reason you need to make a copy of the reading log, you can find a link to it here.) I will be grading this week's Reading Log on Monday, September 22. 

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Summarizing "Tuesday of the Other June" (Day 2)


Warm Up: Fragments and Run On Sentence Practice  Let's continue learning how to identify fragments and run-ons and correct them. Visit the link here and follow the directions. Tomorrow we will have a quiz in which you will be tasked with identifying and repairing run-on sentences. Are you ready?  

Summary Paragraph: "Tuesday of the Other June"  Today you will transform your 'Summary Planner' pre-writing into a 'Summary Paragraph'. Your paragraph must include a topic sentence that identifies the title, author and the topic of the story. The content of the paragraph must incorporate the main events from the beginning, middle and end of the story. Your paragraph should be written in your own words and not include personal opinions. Finally, your paragraph should be well-organized and include appropriate transitions. To help you with your organization, I have placed lists of narrative and expository transition words in your Language Arts folders. (You can also find links to the lists here and here.) Happy Writing! The summary paragraph is due Tuesday, September 23.  

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) Tomorrow is Friday! We have a couple assignments from the week that need to be completed and "turned in" tomorrow Friday, September 18, including: 'The Elements of Fiction' and 'Summary Planner' sections of your 'Writer's Workout #2: Summary' assignment.  

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Summarizing "Tuesday of the Other June"


Summary Writing Overview  When you summarize something, you write in your own words and include only the most important ideas and/or events. To understand the very basics of summary writing, check out the video and graphic below.  



Summary Writing in Practice  Now that we know the basics of summary writing, let's put our understanding into practice. Open the 'Writer's Workout # 2: Summary' document that you have been using with "Tuesday of the Other June". Review the notes you've taken pertaining to the the story's fiction elements. Next, use the "Summary Planner" section of your document to record the title and author of the story, the topic, and the most important events in the beginning, middle, and end of the narrative. "The Summary Planner" will be used as the foundation for the actual "Summary Paragraph" you begin writing tomorrow. As you write about the story's central events remember to focus on only the ones that were central to the story and make sure to practice using your own words. Feel free to refer back to the original story to clarify story details and main events.      

Homework  (1.) Complete the "Summary Planner" section of your 'Writer's Workout #2' assignment. (2.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry.   

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Theme and "Tuesday of the Other June"


Guided Reading and Analyzing Elements of Fiction: "Tuesday of the Other June" (Continued) Today you will continue taking notes on the elements of fiction featured in "Tuesday of the Other June" as I lead you through a guided reading of the story. Remember to use the document 'Writer's Workout #2' in your Language Arts folders.

Reminder: You can find a copy of the "Tuesday of the Other June" reading selection in your folders, as well as a link hereYou can also find a copy of the reading selection on pgs. 80-88 of your Language of Literature textbook.  

Mini-Lesson: Theme  One of the elements of fiction that may not be very clear to you is theme. What is the theme of the story? Watch the video below to learn more.  


Now that you have a better understanding of what theme is, can you determine the theme of "Tuesday of the Other June"? Work with your group to come up with and discuss some possible themes for the story. Be ready to share out with the class.  

Video of the Day  In light of the issues presented in "Tuesday of the Other June," regarding bullying, please take a moment to watch the video "Stand Up," which was featured in the documentary Bully


Homework  (1.) Complete the 'Elements of Fiction' section of the assignment 'Writer's Workout #2'. (2.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry.   


Monday, September 15, 2014

Examining Elements of Fiction in "Tuesday of the Other June"

From The Language of Literature's "Tuesday of the Other June" 
Warm Up: Silent Reading  Happy Monday! You may use this time to read silently from your A.R. book and/or take A.R. quizzes. I will also try to conference with you regarding your reading progress.  

Guided Reading and Analyzing Elements of Fiction: "Tuesday of the Other June" Today we are going to read yet another selection of literature about a young person who is struggling with growing up and personal identity. 

As we read together, I want you to take note of the story's important fictional elements, including its setting, characters, plot, conflict, and theme. Need a quick review of the 'Elements of Fiction'? Let's rewatch the video below. 


You will take notes on the elements of fiction featured in "Tuesday of the Other June" using the document 'Writer's Workout #2' in your Language Arts folders (a link is also here.) 

You can find a copy of the actual "Tuesday of the Other June" reading selection in your folders, as well as a link hereYou can also find a copy of the reading selection on pgs. 80-88 of your Language of Literature textbook.  
  
After we finish reading the story, you will be tasked with writing an organized summary paragraph of "Tuesday of the Other June," which incorporates the fictional elements that you made note of.  

Video of the Day  'Patty Cake' like you've never seen it before. Enjoy!  


Homework  Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry.

Friday, September 12, 2014

Aloha Friday!


Academic Free Time  Progress reports are due today! I would encourage you to go on to SchoolLoop, check your grades and assignment scores and see if there is anything you can do to get your grades up. For example, check the rubric for your 'Character Trait Paragraph' and/or your 'Early Human Assessment Paragraphs,' and ask yourself whether there is anything you can do to strengthen your paragraphs for a higher score. If you have missing or incomplete assignments, complete them. If you do make changes to assignments, please notify your teachers via LoopMail, so we can make the appropriate changes in our gradebooks. If you feel good about your grades, you may use this time to either silent read or take A.R. quizzes.   

Run-on Sentence Practice  Remember that a run-on sentence is two more sentences that are not properly joined or separated. We've learned several different ways to repair run-on sentences. Review the image below for a lesson refresher.  



Now that you clearly understand what a run-on sentence is and some of the different ways to fix them, let's practice. Practice identifying run-on sentences here. Next, practice repairing them here. Finally, play a game in which you identify fragments, run-on, and sentences for cash and prizes here

Homework  Make sure you read for 30 minutes at least once over the weekend and make an entry on your Digital Reading Log(Remember that your reading log has been placed in your Language Arts folders. If for some reason you need to make a copy of the reading log, you can find a link to it here.) I will be grading this week's Reading Log on Monday, September 15. 

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Avoiding Run-On Sentences and Analyzing Poetry


Grammar Lesson: Avoiding Run-On Sentences  What exactly is a run-on sentence and how can you put a stop to them? Let's watch as our friends Tim and Moby from BrainPop explain how. (Remember you can access BrainPop through the Apps section of your Google Drive.)  
  
Poetry Marking: "On Turning 10" (Continued)  Today we will continue to explore and 'mark up' the poem “On Turning 10." You can still find the activity in your Language Arts folders and a link to it is here. You will be working in small groups today, however each of you should also be prepared to share your ideas with the whole-class.  

Homework  1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) Tomorrow is Friday! We have several assignments from the week that need to be completed and "turned in" tomorrow Friday, September 12, including: Making Inferences - 'Dear Future' and Text Marking - 'On Turning 10".  

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Quiz and Library Day


Fragment Quiz  Show me what you've learned about identifying fragments by taking the quiz here. If you finish early, you may read your A.R. book and/or take an A.R. test.  

Library Visit  We're going to the library today! This is your opportunity to trade in books you've finished or are unsatisfied with and get new ones. If you need help finding a good book within your ZPD, let me know. If you are not looking for a book, you may silently read, take A.R. tests, or work on your various digital assignments. If you need help with your poetry assignment from yesterday, I will be available as well. Use your time wisely!  

Homework  Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry.

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Fixing Fragments and Marking Poems


Grammar Warm Up: Identifying and Fixing Fragments  Let's continue practicing identifying and working with fragments. Visit the Online Writing Lab today and identify whether the clause is a fragment or complete sentence in Exercise 1. After completing the 10 questions, click "show my score" and find our how you did. Next, try Exercise 2. This time you will be provided with fragment and you need to identify the choice that corrects the fragment so it is now a complete sentence. Once again, click "show my score" to get your results. Tomorrow, we will be having a 'Fragments Quiz' in which you will similarly need to be able to both identify fragments and correct them. If you would like to learn more about fragments and study for your quiz, try the links here and here.

Poetry Marking: "On Turning 10"  In this activity, you will explore how the speaker of the poem “On Turning 10” feels about growing up by marking the text and answering questions. You can find the activity in your Language Arts folders and a link to it is here


































Homework  (1.)  Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) We are going to the library tomorrow! Bring your books if you would like to exchange them for new ones. (3.) Study for your 'Fragments' quiz. (4.) Complete the 'Poetry Marking' activity. Due: Friday, September 12.   

Monday, September 8, 2014

Failure Is Not an Option!


Alert! Alert! Alert!  This weekend I was beyond disappointed to discover that a large number of you did not complete (and many did not even attempt to complete) your "Eleven" character trait analysis paragraph. What is so "alarming" about is this is that this assignment counts toward your assessment grade and not completing it basically ensures that your current grade in Language Arts becomes an F. What's going on? Were you confused about the assignment? Did you need extra time? How can I help? I will provide some extra time in class today to work on it and extend the deadline until tomorrow. If it's still not complete after tomorrow, you will be pulled into my class at lunch in order to get it done. Failure is not an option! A rubric that shows how the paragraph will be graded can be found here. Those of you who are complete with the assignment and feel satisfied with your final product, may use this time to silent read and take A.R. tests.    

Making Inferences in "Dear Future"  Making an inference means using clues from the text and our own experiences to come to a conclusion. Watch the video below to learn more: 



Now apply what you've learned about inferences to the short story "Dear Future" we've just read, using the document 'Making Inferences ('Dear Future')' in your Language Arts folders. A copy of the assignment cal also be found here and a copy of the short story can be found here. Making inferences in order to answer the two questions and then explain what clues from the story enabled you to come to that conclusion. 

Homework  (1.)  Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (Remember that your reading log has been placed in your Language Arts folders. If for some reason you need to make a copy of the reading log, you can find a link to it here.)  (2.)  Complete your 'Making Inferences' assignment, which will be due this Friday, September 12.  (3.)  Final Deadline for "Character Trait Paragraph" (Writer's Workout #1) is tomorrow, Tuesday, September 9.  

Friday, September 5, 2014

You're Awesome!


Accelerated Reader Appreciation  Happy Friday! I would like to take a moment today to celebrate each of you. I know the adjustment to middle school has not been an easy one for all of you, but I think for the most part you should be really proud of how far you've come and how awesome you've already proven yourselves to be. Simply: You're Awesome!  

You know who is especially awesome? The students who are already racking up reading points in Accelerated Reader! The readers features below are already making measurable progress towards their reading goals. Keep up the great work and keep reading!  



CELDT Test Overview  The annual testing window for the CELDT test has arrived. The CELDT is a test that many of you are familiar with. It is a very important test that determines your proficiency level in the English language and monitors your progress in learning in English from year to year. Many of you will be taking it again this year, so we will dedicate a few minutes of class time providing and overview of the purpose and format of the test. For those of you who are taking it, we want you to feel prepared and be successful! We all believe in you!  

Analyzing Characters in 'Dear Future'  Today we are going to continue the short story "Dear Future." Our focus will be on analyzing the character of James, as we track his changing attitudes about growing up from the beginning of the story to the end. We will also consider the question: What causes James's attitude to change? Once again, you can find a copy of the story "Dear Future" in your Language Arts folders (and a link to it here). The 'Analyzing Characters' assignment was placed in your folders and a link to it can be found here(This assignment will be due Friday of next week.)

Homework  Make sure you read for 30 minutes at least once over the weekend and make an entry on your Digital Reading Log(Remember that your reading log has been placed in your Language Arts folders. If for some reason you need to make a copy of the reading log, you can find a link to it here.) I will be grading this week's Reading Log on Monday, September 8.

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Fragments, Fiction, and the Future


Warm Up: 'Identifying Fragments' Practice  To get started we are going to continue practice identifying fragments. For a refresher on what a fragment is and how to identify one, check out the link here. Next, identify fragments and win prizes by doing the online activity here. Read each passage and use your mouse to choose the part that is a fragment. Finally, for homework tonight, continue your practice by completing the activity 'Identifying Fragments - Practice' in your Language Arts folders. You can also find a link to the document here.  

Scope Magazine Fiction Story: 'Dear Future'   Today we are going to continue to explore short fiction and characters by beginning to read a story from Scope Magazine entitled "Dear Future." Following in the footsteps of Sandra Cisneros's "Eleven" and Lois Lowry's "Who's the New Kid?," "Dear Future" is another piece of literature about identity and growing up. As we read, we will pay special focus to making inferences and analyzing characters. You can find a copy of the story "Dear Future" in your Language Arts folders (and a link to it here). Additionally, two "Dear Future" activity worksheets ('Making Inferences' and 'Analyzing Characters') have also been placed in your folders; links to these assignments are also here and here. We will spend the next several class periods working through this story (and its accompanying 'paired text') together.   

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (Remember that your reading log has been placed in your Language Arts folders. If for some reason you need to make a copy of the reading log, you can find a link to it here.) (2.) Tomorrow is Friday! We have several assignments from the week that need to completed and "turned in" tomorrow Friday, September 5, including: Comparing Texts in 'Eleven'/'Who's the New Girl?', Identifying Fragments, and the Character Traits Paragraph (Writer's Workout #1).  

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Avoiding Sentence Fragments


Grammar in Context - Sentence Fragments  A sentence expresses a complete thought. A fragment is only a piece of a thought. Let's examine several fragments in the short story "Eleven" and see if we can transform them into complete sentences. 



BrainPop Video: Sentence Fragments  Let's continue to learn about what sentence fragments look like and how to avoid them by watching a BrainPop video. I will show the video whole-class and then lead you in an interactive quiz. If afterwards, you would like to explore the topic independently in BrainPop, you may. Just go to Google Drive. Click on the group of squares located towards the top of your Drive screen. Click "More" to see additional apps. Locate "BrainPOP" and click. 



Once you're in the BrainPop program, enter 'Sentence Fragments' in the search bar. From there, locate your chosen topic and explore the video and related activities. 

  
Homework  Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (Remember that your reading log has been placed in your Language Arts folders. If for some reason you need to make a copy of the reading log, you can find a link to it here.)   

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

"Eleven" Extension Activities


Warm Up: Character Traits Paragraph  Welcome to a new week! I hope you had a restful and wonderful Labor Day weekend. You may begin today by continuing to work on your 'Character Traits Paragraph' ('Writer's Workout #1') for the short story "Eleven." If you have already finished your a paragraph, you may silent read and/or take A.R. tests. Reminder: the 'Character Traits Paragraph' ('Writer's Workout #1') must be completed by Friday, September 5.  

"Who's the New Kid" - Comparing Texts  Read the "Who's the New Kid?" by Lois Lowry below. What comparisons can you make between Lois Lowry's experience and Rachel's. What are some similarities and differences between "Who's the New Kid" and "Eleven"? Share your ideas using the document 'Comparing Texts - Eleven/Who's the New Kid' in your Language Arts folders. You may also find a copy the document here.  



Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) Complete 'Character Traits' paragraph ('Writer's Workout #1'). (3.) Complete 'Comparing Texts' assignment. Both assignments due this Friday, September 5.